New Jersey: help the surfing region recover from Hurricane Sandy

Superstorm Sandy washed away beaches and sent raw sewage and diesel fuel into waterways. The environmental impacts are tremendous.


The U.S. Geological Survey estimated more than 90% of the beaches in New Jersey and on New York's Long Island suffered erosion from Sandy, though the extent of the damage had yet to be measured. Restoring or repairing a beach can cost $5 million to $8 million a mile.

As we pause to consider those we have lost from Hurricane Sandy and focus on the immediate recovery efforts for those who have lost their homes, power, water and other life sustaining necessities, we are reminded of the real and devastating effects of major storms whose impacts may be exacerbated by climate change and sea level rise.

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Great White shark: brainiac

Shark brains hold the key to the perfect repellent for the killer great white species. The solution can be as simple as marking patterns on surfboards and wetsuits.


Researchers from the University of Western Australia believe that shark brains share several features with human brains. The creation of effective anti-shark devices may be developed when the complete studies are finished.

"Great white sharks have quite large parts of the brain associated with their visual input, with implications for them being much more receptive to repellents targeting visual markers", explains Kara Yopak.

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Ireland: can you spot Mullaghmore Head?

Ireland will be monitoring the quality of coastal water with the combination of satellite observations and data from ocean buoys.


The European Space Agency (ESA), Ireland’s TechWorks Marine and Greece's Planetek Hellas are working together to deliver timely, high-quality information for water and waste management operators.

The project will not only improve water quality, but also provides a new opportunity for growth in Ireland.

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