Sharks: they love Florida

Thousands of sharks were photographed migrating through the coastal waters off Palm Beach, Florida, by a fast-thinking helicopter pilot who caught the action on his phone’s video camera.

Most are about 100 yards offshore, but many are swimming right to where waves break onshore. Beaches in Broward and Palm Beach counties in Florida have closed, as the sharks are expected to be around for a couple of weeks.

Most of the sharks are Blacktip and Spinner sharks, which are not considered man-eaters, but have been known to bite. Small groups were even spotted around swimmers who showed no fear or awareness of the danger.

More than 100,000 sharks are thought to be infesting the waters of Florida.

SOURCE: Surfrider Foundation

Corona Extra Save the Beach Hotel: as good as the beer

A hotel made of trash collected in the beaches of Europe has beeen built and installed by the prestigious artist HA Schult, in the central Callao Square, in Madrid, Spain. The "Corona Extra Save the Beach Hotel" is built with twelve tons of trash and offer visitors an experience with a strong environmental commitment.

HA Schult is famous for his work "Trash Men", a piece that is composed of thousands of life-sized human figures completely made of trash. This pioneering project wants to make people aware of the need to take care of the beaches of Europe. Anyone can bring up a case of a beach in a bad shape and upload a video or a photo on the web page. Helena Christense, top model, has slept in the iconic hotel.

A voting is carried out each year among all the cases received to choose the beach that needs it the most. In 2010, Corona Extra cleaned, with the help of volunteers, the Bay of Portmán beach, in Murcia, and in 2009, the beach selected by the Internet users was Capocotta, very close to Rome.

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Folly Beach: the sand is disappearing

Mother Nature has been warning us for quite a while. World beaches are eroding very quickly and structural measures are still to be taken. Meanhwile, in Folly Beach, USA, the local authorities are asking for federal money in order to initiate beach renourishment projects.

Interestingly, the pledge of aid come only five years after a $12 million project moved millions of tons of sand onto Folly Beach. Tropical stoms, winds and swells are destroying the beautiful beaches of the region of Charleston.

Nearly one-third of the 5-mile beach has lost enough sand to meet the federal requirement for needing renourishment, which is that 60 feet or less of beach remains at high tide. The question is: how long will last the next improvement measures?