Glaciers: melting fast

Twenty percent of all the ice contained in Canada's glaciers could melt by the end of this century.


The study developed by Geophysical Research Letters has reached a dramatic conclusion. If global average temperatures rise three degrees Celsius and by eight degrees in the Canadian Arctic, sea levels may go up by 3,5 centimeters.

If 20% of Canada's glaciers melt, this means 75% more water than previously thought. Also, when combined with melting glaciers such as those in Greenland, Russia and South America, the situation gets worse.

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Waves: destructive energy and power

The earthquake zones off of certain coasts – like those of Japan and Java - make them especially vulnerable to tsunamis.

The new study authored by Utku Kanoglu and Costas Synolakis has changed the way scientists explain the rules of tsunami. Until now, it was largely believed that the maximum tsunami height onshore could not exceed the depth of the seafloor.

The recent research shows that when focusing occurs, the scaling relationship breaks down and flooding can be up to 50 percent deeper with waves that do not lose height as they get closer to shore.

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The Red Sea Canyon: deep under the water of Suez

The HMS Enterprise has discovered a 250 meter-deep (820ft) canyon beneath the Red Sea.


The Royal Navy ship found and mapped the underwater Grand Canyon, beneath the waves, using state-of-the-art technology.

The discovery happede when the HMS Enterprise was sailing in a nine-month mission to improve understanding of the waters east of Suez.

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