Marine Litter Strategy petition 

Clean water campaigners from Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) believe that the UK Government urgently needs a National Marine Litter Strategy to tackle the worsening crisis of litter in our oceans and across our beaches.


Co-ordinated action directed by the Prime Minister is vital in order to reduce the tide of plastic and other manmade debris washing up on the UK’s shores each and every day. 

On the opening day of the WQS O’Neill Cold Water Classic, SAS were joined by some of the world’s best surfers to call for the Prime Minister to take urgent action to increase protection levels for our oceans in relation to litter.

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Surfers Against Sewage

Clean water campaigners from Surfers Against Sewage (SAS) took their giant soapbox to the Hayle Co-operative supermarket today to launch SAS’s new ‘Go Phosphate Free’ campaign ahead of World Water Day (on the 22nd of March). 


The SAS campaigners gave away over 600 samples of phosphate free Ecover washing powders to shoppers as a positive example of a low impact alternative.

Phosphates in washing powders can often pass through the sewage treatment works untouched.  Once these phosphates enter our rivers and seas, they can cause eutrophication, or over-enrichment.  Over-enrichment of our rivers and seas can result in harmful algal blooms.  Excessive phosphates can result in an inability to support life, effectively turning our rivers, seas and our beloved surf spots into dead-zones.

SAS are lobbying the Government for a ban on laundry based phosphate detergents.  This will help the UK meet targets set by the EU Water Framework Directive whilst delivering cost savings for water companies and hopefully taking the pressure off bill payers.

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Moreton Island, Queensland 

Last Thursday, Queensland, Australia, suffered one of its worst environmental disasters.

A cargo ship leaked tons of fuel into the ocean after cyclonic seas caused containers of ammonium nitrate to break loose and rip giant holes in the hull of the ship.

Why the ship was out in these rough sea conditions will be the subject of a full investigation.

To date, the total amount of oil spilled has not been determined, but a spokesman for the company Swire Shipping, Ltd.

which owns the vessel in question, says that it's believed to be significantly more than the 11,000 gallons originally estimated.

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