Oil rigs: when will they be closed?

On Sunday, the BP well that fed the largest offshore oil spill in America's history was officially pronounced "dead," with no chance of further leaks.

While we are happy to report that a single drop will never again leak from this well, we find it appropriate to break down the Gulf oil spill by the numbers (as reported by the Los Angeles Times).

205.8 million gallons of oil spilled.
33.6 million gallons of oil recovered by BP ships.
10.35 million feet of booms deployed.
11.14 million gallons of oil removed in controlled burns.
1.84 million gallons of chemical dispersants used.
11 oil rig workers killed.
5,939 dead birds collected.
584 dead sea turtles collected.
92 dead dolphins collected.
2 dead whales collected.
966 miles of shoreline hit by oil at peak.
88,522 peak area of federal waters, in square miles, closed to fishing.

The well may be capped... but the work is far from over.

Source: Surfrider Foundation

Ecoshape: producing clean surfboards | Photo: Line Up Surfboards

The 2010 Ecoshape guide, commissioned by EuroSIMA Cluster, contains helpful information to build or develop a shaping workshop respecting Health, Safety and Environment.

More than 2 years of research and testing in experimental workshops have been necessary to develop this guide for professional and amateur. In Europe, the number of shapers is estimated at 400 professionals and several thousand non-professionals.

Innovative tools to evaluate working conditions have been used in partnership with professional ergonomists and the Regional Agency for the Improvement of Working Conditions of Aquitaine. A software has also been specially developed and is now used nationally by the services of prevention of professional risk.

These studies have shown that shapers were exposed to unsafe acts up to 83% of working time, while a turnover of shaping stages and the installation of low-cost equipment can reduce the time of exposure to 30%.

The recovery of energy through heat exchangers can heat continuously workshops in winter while saving energy and therefore money. The shaper can maintain its activity throughout the year whatever the external conditions.

Beach water: testing one, two, three

Just because your local beach hasn't been closed in awhile doesn't mean it's somehow gotten cleaner-in fact it may be dirtier.

"Isn't that what water quality testing is for?" you may be wondering.

Well, yes, assuming that it's being done. According to an unnerving investigation conducted by the LA Times, beach health testing is at an all-time low since it was made law in 1999.

According to the law, beaches are required to test water quality at least once per week in summer months. Many beaches had been testing extensively year round, and on a near daily basis in the summer.

Currently, however, many government agencies are appealing to the law's unfortunate loophole-if the project isn't fully funded, testing isn't required.

Now beaches like Trestles, where thousands of people surf year-round, are being tested four times annually where they used to be tested 70 times annually. Not exactly reassuring, is it?

Source: Surfrider