Maldives: losing war to rising sea level

New Orleans, New York, Miami, Venice, Bangkok, Shanghai, Bangladesh, the Netherlands, and Maldives are losing war with rising seas.


According to a study published in the Geophysical Research Letters by John A. Church and Neil J. White, the Earth's oceans rose by an average 7.7 inches (195 mm) between 1870 and 2004.

People tend to be drawn to coastal cities for their beauty and beautiful views, which is why they are such heavily populated areas and so desirable for summer vacations.

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Puerto Escondido: this wave is in danger

Puerto Escondido, one of the best surf spots in the world, is threatened by pollution and the construction of a marina.


The beaches of Puerto Escondido, in Mexico, have been attracting thousands of surf tourists for many years. The quality of the local Mexican waves are known all over the world.

There are several perfect spots for surfing and bodyboarding. Playa Zicatela is home to an IBA World Tour stop, for example.

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Tsunamis: does the answer lie in the magnetic fields?

Tsunamis may be detected in real-time by satellites. Chinese researchers believe to have created a model that simulates the effect of huge ocean waves on the Earth's magnetic field.


Time is everything, when it comes to avoiding the brutal impact of tsunamis. These large and rare waves, which are often associated with earthquakes, are usually devastating.

When a body of salt water moves through the Earth's magnetic field its conductive nature induces a small anomaly in the field, which can be monitored by unmanned near-space airships, low Earth orbit satellites or high altitude balloons. These options are close enough to the ocean to detect the magnetic signal of the wave.

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