Greenland: the glaciers are melting fast | Photo: NASA/NordForsk

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has revealed that the seas of the world have risen three inches (eight centimeters) since 1992. Data suggests that the sea level will likely increase by one meter or more in the next 100-200 years.

The satellite measurements from NASA and its partners concluded that about one-third of sea level rise is caused by expansion of warm ocean water, one-third is due to ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and the remaining third results from melting mountain glaciers.

"Given what we know now about how the ocean expands as it warms and how ice sheets and glaciers are adding water to the seas, it's pretty certain we are locked into at least 3 feet [0.9 meter] of sea level rise, and probably more. But we don't know whether it will happen within a century or somewhat longer," explains Steve Nerem, a member of the Sea Level Change Team.

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Bloom: a traction pad made from algae | Photo: Bloom

Two companies have announced the launch of the world's first algae-derived traction pad.

Algix and Effect have joined forces to create Bloom, a brand that will explore the possibilities behind eco-friendly foams. One of their products is the surf pad.

"Surfers, standup paddlers, and skimboarders commonly utilize closed cell foams for traction when recreating. Bloom offers the best in environmentally thoughtful foams without sacrificing durability and performance. Once you sink your feet into Bloom foam you won't ever go back!" the company underlines.

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Deep Blue: the world's largest great white shark | Photo: Mauricio Hoyos Padilla

A group of marine scientists has filmed what is considered to be one of the largest great white sharks ever found on Planet Earth.

"Deep Blue" is a 50-year-old female great white shark. She was spotted near Guadalupe Island, a volcanic island located 150 miles off the coast of Baja California.

"When I saw 'Deep Blue' for the first time, there was just one thought in my mind: hope. A shark of that size is at least 50 years old and that tells me protection and conservation efforts are really working," explains Mauricio Hoyos Padilla, a member of the scientific team that encountered the shark and director of shark conservation group Pelagios Kakunja.

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