Kiteboarding: will there be wind in Rio de Janeiro

How many national sailing federations are ready to prepare kiteboarding teams, gear and equipment for the 2016 Olympic Games, in Rio de Janeiro?


Is there a global network of continental, national and regional kiteboarding competitions ready to define who will be competing for gold, silver and bronze medals in the 2016 Olympic Games?

Why was Course Race kiteboarding chosen to showcase in the 2016 Olympic Games, instead of Freestyle, when these kiteboard races will simply be just another speed sailing contest out in the regatta field?

How to ensure there will be enough wind to launch kites during the tight Olympic schedules? Has ISAF thought of an ideal venue in the Rio de Janeiro region?

What will NeilPryde do with the RS:X gear and are they interested in supplying the official Olympic kiteboarding equipment? While kiteboarding celebrates a hard-fought victory over windsurfing for the Olympic ticket, many questions remain unanswered.

In New Zealand, for example, a country with a strong Olympic sailing tradition, the national governing body is disappointed with the decision to replace windsurfing.

"We have recently invested significant resources into rebuilding windsurfing within our development programmes" said Yachting New Zealand's Chief Executive Dave Abercrombie.

"This is a major setback but if it’s a fait accompli, we will have to adapt and get up to speed as soon as we can".Yachting New Zealand does not currently have plan for its national kiteboarders and still doesn't know how and who will prepare a team that will aim for glory in the class.