In recent years, the Oregon Public Health Division has received reports from a number of windsurfers and kiteboarders about respiratory ailments and skin infections they experienced after surfing.

In order to better understand the incidence and cause of illnesses and injuries related to windsurfing and kiteboarding, we are doing a study among windsurfers and kiteboarders.

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A kitesurfer has powered his way into the record books via the Isle of Wight. Despite strong wind warnings and adverse tide conditions, James Meaning completed what is believed to be the first circumnavigation of the Isle of Wight using a kitesurfing board.

The Yarmouth man set off from the town at 8.30am on Saturday and finished the 55-mile route on his 4ft board in six hours and 13 minutes, at speeds averaging more than 15 knots.

Conditions were favourable until he reached St Catherine’s Point, the southern tip of the Island. There, the wind increased to more than 25 knots, or Force 6, and James had to tack the kite directly upwind to reach Bembridge. It meant the 38-year-old covered 100 miles in total. James hung on upwind and on to the final turn downwind from Bembridge to Cowes and back to Yarmouth.

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Kite lines laid out on the beach perceived as an entanglement hazard, getting close to other users while traveling at high speeds, jumping over other users and disruption of fish, leading to poor fishing are the main problems often reported by Hawaiian users (swimmers, fishermen, sunbathers, vessel operators, etc), a State of Hawaii study has concluded.

Five ocean recreation sports were targeted in this study: kiteboarding, surfing, kayaking, scuba, and snorkeling. These were chosen based on the increasing popularity and use levels of these sports, based on community concerns received by the Department about ocean recreation use conflicts occurring within and among these sports, and because commercial tours and lessons are occurring for all of these sports.

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