Keep Surfing: a river wave party

"Keep Surfing" tells the story of an unlikely passion in a place that a large part of the world only knows as Oktoberfest City.


Munich, the town of beer drinkers and pretzel lovers, has become the home of a surfing crowd of urban individualists who pursue their dream of happiness by riding a river wave far from the ocean.

"Keep Surfing" portrays six surfers of the Eisbach hardcore, who master the river waves while pursuing their own individual goals in life. Among the older guys is Dieter "The Eater," who was among the first to discover river surfing in the late 60s and still rides the waves every day with his two grown daughters.

And Walter, the "janitor of the Eisbach," a working-class philosopher who discovered a way to keep the wave surging for 24 hours a day and who now lives as a kind of lone wolf and didgeridoo maker near a small beach in Sardinia, where he rides his own wave every day.

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Tim Boal: 'hey, are you a robot?'

Helicam International teamed up with Extreme Sports photographer Dom Daher to shoot aerial photos of world class surfer Tim Boal. Click here to view the 'Making Of' video showing a behind-the-scenes look at how the pictures were taken.

The helicopter was launched from the pier at Hendaye, France.

In the end of the day, the crew added a flash device to capture intense surfing in rare conditions. Is this the future of pro surfing photography in international contests?

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Simon Anderson: three is the magic number

This year marks the 30-year anniversary of legendary Australian surfer and shaper Simon Anderson's seminal Thruster surfboard design. On August 14 & 15 Sacred Craft will honor Simon Anderson during the Tribute to the Masters Shape-off presented by US Blanks.

"Simon Anderson's surfing suited single-fins, but the events at the time were all being won on twins. Frustration led him to consider a weird-looking mix -- three smaller fins, one set three inches from the tail, the other two set 11 inches up and on either rail a la the twinnie," explained surf historian/writer Nick Carroll.

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