O’Neill Cold Water Classic Canada

The Association of Surfing Professionals (ASP) World Qualifying Series (WQS) 6-Star O’Neill Cold Water Classic Canada saw the event’s top seeds take to the water today in windy two-to-four foot (1 metre) surf and event organizers utilized the event’s mobile permit to land at North Chesterman’s beach today, completing the first 13 heats of Round 2.

The O’Neill Cold Water Classic Canada is the fourth of five stops on the O’Neill Cold Water Classic Series and the event’s ASP 6-Star status plays a crucial role in all surfers quests towards qualification for the 2010 ASP Dream Tour.

Nathan Yeomans (San Clemente, CA), 28, is currently sitting just outside of the qualification bubble for next year’s ASP World Tour and the Southern Californian’s hunger to find his way amongst the top 45 was obvious when he dominated his Round of 96 heat today. Yeomans unleashed a precise forehand attack on two sectiony lefthanders to bash the day’s highest heat total (a 17.10 out of 20) while advancing through to the Round of 48.

“For the first 10 minutes in that heat I really didn’t have any scores,” Yeomans said. “We’re pretty much down to the last quarter of the year for qualifying and I knew it was really important for me to make that heat. I’m just outside of the bubble and I was looking to start off strong, so I’m stoked.”

With four premier events remaining on the 2009 ASP WQS season, Yeomans is out to climb back into a firm spot within the top of the ASP WQS rankings to solidify his spot on next year’s ASP World Tour. The explosive goofy-footer has his sights set on a victory at the O’Neill Cold Water Classic Canada as a jumpstart to the remainder of the year.

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Bede Durbidge

The final day of the Rip Curl Pro Search is underway with the Semifinals hitting the three-to-four foot (1 metre) waves on offer at Supertubos at 8:30am.

Event No. 9 of 10 on the 2009 ASP World Tour, the Rip Curl Pro Search experienced one of the most impressive days of competition yesterday with solid six-to-eight foot (2 – 3 metre) barrels for the world’s best to sink their teeth into. Today promises the same high drama to complete the competition this morning before the ASP Top 17 take to the water this afternoon.

“The surf has ped a bit this morning but we’ve got offshore winds and clean conditions and will be starting at 8:30am,” Damien Hardman, Rip Curl Pro Search Contest Director, said. “We’re expecting to finish the men’s competition this morning before heading into the women’s Round 1.”

Owen Wright (AUS), 19, wildcard in the Rip Curl Pro Search and current No. 3 on the ASP World Qualifying Series (WQS), has been in electrifying form all event before suffering a horrific wipeout yesterday and rupturing his ear drum. While the Australian wunderkind has been cautioned to stay out of the water for a week, he is still a possibility to compete against current ASP World No. 1, Mick Fanning (AUS), 28, in Semifinal 2.

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Mick Fanning

Solid six-to-eight foot (2 – 3 metre) barrels opened up Supertubos today as the Rip Curl Pro Search finally utilized its primary venue for some incendiary Round 3 and Quarterfinal action.

Event No. 9 of 10 on the 2009 ASP World Tour, the Rip Curl Pro Search had yet to run at Supertubos, but today’s death-defying conditions provided a dramatic forum for the world’s best surfers to showcase their talents, and played a pivotal role in the hunt for the 2009 ASP World Title.

Joel Parkinson (AUS), 28, current ASP World No. 2, found a sensational return to form today, besting Kai Otton (AUS), 29, in Round 3 before taking out a rampaging Bobby Martinez (USA), 27, in the Quarterfinals.

A standout leader throughout the opening half of the season, Parkinson stumbled with three consecutive Equal 17th place finishes in California, France and Spain before punctuating an already-stellar run in Portugal with today’s advancement to the Semifinals.

“I’m just living to keep my dream alive,” Parkinson said. “I don’t focus on the opponent. I still have two heats to go and two heats to win and then the job is done.”

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