Surfing in Spain: more than just flamenco music

Some of the best surfing in Europe lies in Spain, with over 4,000km of coastline from the stunning, mountainous coastline of Cantabria in the North, to the low lying, dry coastline in the south. Surf breaks such as Mundaka, Barbate, Los Locos and Santa Marina are a few that are well known around the world.

Surfing in Spain was first introduced around 1960 when some traveling French surfers went on safari looking for new waves in the Basque Region. Since then, surfing has caught fire with the Spanish people, producing some of Europe's best surfing talent.

Today, Spain holds some of the world's greatest waves, and the Billabong Pro Mundaka is a major stop on the ASP World Tour circuit. With an adventurous spirit and a little planning, surfing Spain can be an amazing experience, both in and out of the water.

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Surfing in India: you never know when you meet a God

The sub-continent of India has 7,000 kilometers (4,349 miles) of coastline. The greater portion of that is still unexplored, in terms of locating surf spots. There are waves in India all year round, averaging 3 to 5 feet, but the season for big waves is May through September.

This is the pre-monsoon and monsoon season. At this time, the surf will range from 8 to 15 feet and bigger - often blown out and messy but sometimes the conditions are fantastic - super glassy and offshore winds world class waves.

On the westcoast, the swell direction is usually best when coming from the south or west, although an occasional north swell does get good. On the east coast the swell is almost always from the south or slight southeast direction.

Along the 7000 kilometers of coastline in India there are at least 200 surfable river mouths. River mouths usually have distinct and consistent sand bar formations created by the river flow and these make for very good breaks - like beach breaks, but with a lot less close outs.

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