Surfers get ready to clean the British coastline

September 4, 2014 | Environment
Plastic bags: killing waves and marine life | Photo: Surfers Against Sewage

Surfers Against Sewage is calling for 3500 volunteers to remove many thousands of tonnes of marine litter from the British coastline, between 17th-19th October, 2014.

The "Autumn Beach Clean Series" will run 150 community events across the United Kingdom to protect beaches, waves and wildlife from the marine litter crisis haunting the coastlines.

The volunteers may expect that the majority of marine litter consists of plastic items such as drinks bottles, carrier bags, fishing waste and sewage-related debris.

"At sea, it is estimated that a 100,000 marine mammals and a million seabirds die every year through entanglement in and ingestion of marine litter," explain Surfers Against Sewage.

Plastics can take hundreds of years to degrade in the marine environment, haunting marine life, ecosystems and compromising the enjoyment and experiences of coastal visitors everywhere.

Surfers Against Sewage also teamed up with World Animal Protection to raise the profile of the growing threat of ghost fishing gear that continues to indiscriminately catch, injure and kill fish, marine mammals, seabirds and other wildlife in our oceans.

Protect your home break. Join Surfers Against Sewage.

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  • Every year, nonprofit environmental organization Heal the Bay assigns A-to-F letter grades to beaches along the California coast.
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  • Have you ever wondered how a beach is formed? The formation of sand strips is a long process that involves minerals, water, wind, waves, and tides.

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