Using marine resources sustainably with Marine Spatial Planning

October 22, 2013 | Environment
Marine Spatial Planning: it involves surfers beachgoers and other recreational users

A new short film explores the opportunity to protect Washington's Pacific coast through marine spatial planning.

Filmmakers Chris Hannant and Gillian Montgomery interview Surfrider members and other stakeholders as they travel the state's rugged coastline.

"Marine Spatial Planning on the Washington Coast" is a simple documentary about simple actions that can be taken to protect coastal areas.

"Marine spatial planning sounds a lot more complicated that it really is. It's really just about being smart about how we use our oceans", says Chad Nelsen, environmental director at Surfrider Foundation.

"In the last couple hundred years, we've treated the ocean same as we treat the gold rush. First come, first served attitude".

Featuring beautiful scenery from the Olympic Peninsula, the film makes a compelling case for surfers, beachgoers and other recreational users to get involved with marine spatial planning.

  • A sun dog, or sundog, is a natural optical phenomenon consisting of one or two colored luminous spots appearing on either side of the Sun.
  • Every year, nonprofit environmental organization Heal the Bay assigns A-to-F letter grades to beaches along the California coast.
  • A heat wave, or heatwave, is a period of two or more consecutive days with apparent temperatures exceeding 105°F to 110°F (40°C to 43°C) on National Weather Service's Heat Index.
  • Have you ever wondered how a beach is formed? The formation of sand strips is a long process that involves minerals, water, wind, waves, and tides.

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