Kiteboarding: reaching out to a wider audience | Photo: Lukas Prudky/Red Bull

Isaac Spedding, a webcast director from New Zealand, has a plan to produce the ultimate live stream production for the newly-created 2015 Virgin Kitesurf World Championships (VKWC).

Spedding, who has worked with with MTV, Facebook, The World Economic Forum, The Clinton Global Initiative, South By Southwest Music Festival, and Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week, wants to take kiteboarding into the mainstream stages.

"I'm essentially pitching for my dream job. With the Virgin Kitesurf World Championships in a transitional year, they need to take advantage of this time to reimagine how the sport is represented online," explains Isaac Spedding.

"The goal is to add storytelling and education to the young sport which will open up the viewership and increase revenue and publicity. The project will also showcase the latest in webcast technology."

Spedding has set the entire plan. For example, he wants to develop a mobile app that allows spectators and kiteboarding fans to access to multiple cameras, be part of Q&A sessions with riders, purchase equipment and clothing they see and learn about the sport.

With a total annual cost for first year of $1,698,632, Spedding promises a global media coverage of the 12 events lined up for the 2015 VKWC season, including flights, accommodation, production, hardware, insurance and crew expenses.

"Traditionally the focus of large broadcasts is to sell the rights to media markets around the world. For example, rugby sells well in New Zealand and Australia where there are media markets specifically interested in the sport," underlines Spedding.

"Kiteboarding is similar to surfing in that there is a large amount of fans in many parts of the world which make up a significant audience. The best way to reach that global audience is to put the webcast at the forefront and make it the preferred viewing method."

What will Richard Branson (Virgin) and Javier Perez Dolset (ZED) think about the plan to boost kiteboarding's notoriety?

It is one of the sport's most forgotten disciplines. The stand-up bodyboarding movement had its heyday between the late 1980s and early 1990s, but it continues to be an exquisite art.

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