Arugam Bay: a perfect point break in Sri Lanka | Photo: Arugam Safa Surf School

Nauru, Sri Lanka and Cayman Islands have become the 87th, 88th and 89th members of the International Surfing Association (ISA).

It's almost there. The world governing body for the sport of surfing is close to reaching its goal of 100 member nations in 2015.

"Surfing is also a 22 billion dollar business with a natural focus on the youth demographic. By taking the sport to new destinations we can help stimulate local economies, create jobs and provide young people with a source of fun, engagement and lessons of excellence, fair play and respect," underlines Fernando Aguerre, president of the ISA.

Nauru, a small 21 square kilometer island in the southwest Pacific Ocean, has a thriving surfing community, where the Nauru Surf Club works as a watersports center and lifeguarding service.

Sri Lanka is one of the most popular surf destinations in the Indian Ocean and has attracted surfers to its world-class waves for many years. Arugam Bay Surfing Access For All, the Sri Lankan Surfing Federation, is using surfing as a tool for community development and social inclusion.

The Cayman Islands, located in the northwest Caribbean Sea, averages swells of 3-5 feet that can reach 8-12 feet on better days. The Cayman Islands Surfing Association is also determined to place emphasis on the protection and sustainability of its surfing environment.