Filipe Toledo: doing his own thing | Photo: Smorigo/WSL

The quarterfinalists of the Oi Rio Pro 2015 have been decided in three-to-five foot (1 - 1.5 metre) surf at Barra da Tijuca.

The majority of the top seeds are out of competition. Will it be a game of the underdogs? Maybe. Filipe Toledo rapidly secured one of the eight tickets for the quarterfinals with a victory in Round 4 against Matt Banting and John John Florence.

"I'm spending a lot of time with my family and friends and that really helps. I really love the crowds here; it's a real motivation for me and the best feeling in the world. I feel blessed to have this support," revealed Toledo.

"Unfortunately Gabriel and Adriano lost today but I'm comfortable and confident, and I'll try my best to be in the Final and represent Brazil. I really want the yellow jersey back too."

Italo Ferreira will surf against Jadson Andre in the quarterfinals. Ferreira had Florence in a combination situation with ten minutes remaining and held on to his lead to claim his Round 5 clash.

"That was a great heat. I caught some good waves, and I just love it here with all the people on the beach. I'm super stoked to make it through. I'm really pleased to be surfing against Jadson in the quarterfinals, he's my friend so I think it will be great," added Toledo.

Ricardo Christie is quietly doing his job. The surfer from New Zealand eliminated rankings leader and local favorite De Souza in Round 3 and defeated Matt Banting in Round 5. It's his best result ever in the Dream Tour.

"I just wanted to concentrate on what I was doing. The waves were super fun, and I tried to stick to my gameplan and get some scores early. I'm stoked to come out with a win, and it's a real confidence booster. I'm looking to turn things around and get on a roll," concluded Christie.

Oi Rio Men's Pro 2015 | Quarterfinal Match-Ups

Filipe Toledo (BRA) vs. Ricardo Christie (NZL)
Jadson Andre (BRA) vs. Italo Ferreira (BRA)
Josh Kerr (AUS) vs. Bede Durbidge (AUS)
Matt Wilkinson (AUS) vs. Owen Wright (AUS)

It is one of the sport's most forgotten disciplines. The stand-up bodyboarding movement had its heyday between the late 1980s and early 1990s, but it continues to be an exquisite art.

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