Jeremy Flores: perfect surf | Photo: Poullenot/WSL

The Round 2 of the 2015 Quiksilver Pro France has been completed in six-to-eight-foot (2- 2.5 meters) at Cul Nuls.

Kelly Slater was one of the top seeds who survived the early cut. The Floridian champion drew his own game against an uninspired Aritz Aranburu. For Slater, the party continues.

"The conditions are flawless but there's a lot of water moving around, and it hasn't sorted itself out yet. Realistically I don't have much of a shot at the world title; these guys would have to mess up pretty bad, and that hasn't really been happening," explained Slater.

Jeremy Flores had the support of his local fans and also managed to move through to Round 3 with his usual frontside barrel skills. Dusty Payne was the victim.

"In this heat I got one good wave and hopefully in the next I can get a few more. I always want to do good here, and there's a lot of support for me in France so I want to give back. I'll have to fight that pressure and turn it into something positive," added Flores.

However, the surfer of the day was clearly Maxime Huscenot, who forced Filipe Toledo to pack his surfboard travel bags and head to Portugal.

"I started on the lefts but was struggling to keep my line and was sliding in the barrel, so I moved to where Filipe was, and that's where I found my best wave. I'm very happy to be here, and I feel fortunate to receive this wildcard," concluded Huscenot.

2015 Quiksilver Pro France | Round 3 Matchups

Julian Wilson (AUS) vs. Brett Simpson (USA)
Nat Young (USA) vs. Jadson Andre (BRA)
Kelly Slater (USA) vs. Kolohe Andino (USA)
Italo Ferreira (BRA) vs. Keanu Asing (HAW)
Bede Durbidge (AUS) vs. Adrian Buchan (AUS)
Mick Fanning (AUS) vs. Maxime Huscenot (FRA)
Adriano de Souza (BRA) vs. Tomas Hermes (BRA)
Kai Otton (AUS) vs. John John Florence (HAW)
Jeremy Flores (FRA) vs. Michel Bourez (PYF)
Josh Kerr (AUS) vs. Matt Wilkinson (AUS)
Owen Wright (AUS) vs. Dane Reynolds (USA)

It is one of the sport's most forgotten disciplines. The stand-up bodyboarding movement had its heyday between the late 1980s and early 1990s, but it continues to be an exquisite art.

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