How to regain your love of surfing

May 9, 2019 | Surfing
Surfing: if you need a break from the waves, take it | Photo: Shutterstock

Have you lost motivation to go surfing? Are you tired of watching endless clips online featuring perfect waves and outstanding pro surfers?

The stoke is gone, and you aren't having the time of your life anymore. There can be many reasons for someone to lose interest in surfing. Life's in continuous change, and so are passionate surfers.

Age, work, family and kids, diseases, and psychological trauma can get in the way and force us to put surfing aside.

But that may not be forever.

There are a few actions that you can take in your life to ignite a lost flame and once again enjoy the thrill of riding a wave on a sunny and windless day.

If surfing is not making you happy, think about making subtle changes in your daily habits. Believe it or not, they might make a difference.

You'll notice that, sooner or later, surfing's magical appeal will once again invade your brain, and the love of riding waves will return.

But if you're still not convinced, explore the following tips and suggestions.

Perfect waves: social media is slowly killing the spirit of surfing | Photo: Shutterstock

Unfollow All Surf-Related Pages on Social Media

Until the early 2000s, surfers had to wait a week or a month to get the latest updates, photos, and stories via surf magazines.

Today, everyone can quickly watch and "like" hundreds of pictures and videos in less than an hour.

"The problem with social media is you rarely see life experiences in their entirety. Instead, you get only what people want you to see," bodyboarding legend, Mike Stewart, once wrote.

"This leads to unrealistic ideas of reality and expectations that can lead to states of depression which is becoming an increasingly serious issue."

Are you spending a large percentage of your day looking at your smartphone and consuming large doses of surf imagery? Are you trivializing surfing?

Stay away or unfollow pro surfers and surf-related social media pages for a while. It could help.

Surf photos: browse your photo archive from time to time to reignite your inner stoke | Photo: Shutterstock

Browse Your Photo Archive

Do you still remember the best waves of your life? Who was with you? And what about the best conditions you've ever encountered at your local break? How beautiful were the waves?

Browsing your photo archive is like embarking on a time-travel journey to some of the most cherished moments of your life as a surfer.

You'll feel much better knowing that you had fun for so many years.

And why not select the best shots and send them to your best friends?

Stay Away from the Beach for a While

Sometimes, we need to stay away from the people, the places, and even the objects that we love.

Why? Because it gives us a fresh new perspective about life with and without them.

Too much surfing could not be the best thing for you at a given stage of your existence.

So, keep a distance from the beach and the waves, and let your body and mind tell you when to get back to it.

Beach life: sometimes we need to keep a distance from the things we love most | Photo: Shutterstock

Plan a Surf Boat Trip

Have you ever been in a boat surrounded by people whose sole purpose is to score the best waves of their lives?

Give it a go. It can be a remarkable experience and will allow you to meet surfers from all corners of the globe, with their unique approaches to life and the sport itself.

Surf boat trips are incredibly fun and are not that expensive.

Explore New Surf Spots

You don't need to be a pro surfer or a highly paid free surfer to find new secrets spots and surf uncharted waves.

Explore the spots that may be within driving distance from your home break. They exist; they're out there waiting to be discovered.

New positive experiences will help you reconnect with surfing by creating unexpected, fun and unforgettable experiences out in the ocean.

Surfing: it's all about the exploration and the fun we get out in the water | Photo: Shutterstock

Shape a Surfboard

Have you ever ridden a surfboard made by your own hands?

Forget about the flaws and imprecisions. It's all about riding something that you've built.

A homemade surfboard may very well become your favorite wave riding craft.

Explore the History of Surfing

Victor Hugo, a French poet and dramatist, once said that history is "an echo of the past in the future; a reflex from the future on the past."

Learning more about the rich history of surfing will inevitably make you a better surfer.

And there are so many interesting stories, details, and secrets about this sport.

Grab a good surf book and explore the ancient board making techniques, the culture and lifestyle, the historical heats and contests, and the names that helped shape this sport for eternity.

Invite Your Best Friend for a Surf

Surfing all by yourself has its virtues and benefits, but enjoying a few idyllic waves with a friend can also be fun and exciting.

Plan a dawn patrol, have breakfast together, discuss your strike mission share a few waves, and enjoy a well-deserved post-surf beer.

There's nothing quite like it.

Party waves: surf with your friends and share a few playful rides | Photo: Shutterstock

Don't Take your Surfing Too Seriously

Our surfing is the reflection of who we are.

Change your mindset. Paddle out with a single goal - to have fun and do good to yourself.

Forget about wave priority wars and snaking tactics. Free yourself from everything that holds you back, and enjoy the moment.

Have you fallen off the board on an easy ride? No worries. There will always be another wave. Just don't be too harsh on yourself, and go with the flow.

Let Mother Nature guide you.

Cherish Every Wave

If it's perfect, paddle out and enjoy every wave. But if it's onshore, small or closing out, get out there too.

There is always a board for every type of wave. The only thing that counts is being in the water.

And no one is going to judge and sentence you for riding one-foot waves. Who cares? You were there; everyone else went back home dry and grumpy.