Japan: the Land of the Surfing Sun

The 2020 Summer Olympics are heading to Tokyo, the capital of Japan. Interestingly, the largest metropolitan area in the world is known for hosting world-class surf spots.

Tokyo, year 2020. While tourists and sports fans are in the city for the Olympic Games, local surfers will be riding their every day waves. In fact, the Chiba region, near Tokyo, is considered to be the birthplace and capital of the Japanese surfing culture.

Choshi, Onjuku and Ichinomiya, located 40 kilometers away from the capital, are some of Chiba's best surfing spots. Fishing harbors and pollution are the greatest threat to wave and surfing here.

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Surfing in The Rock of Gibraltar

Gibraltar has an area of only 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2). The territory is disputed by the United Kingdom and Spain, but for surfers it only matters if it's pumping.

Gibraltar offers 12 kilometers of coastline. You could easily round the territory by bike in a couple of hours to check the surf. It's Britain, in the sun.

With only 30,000 Gibraltarians, the chances of finding a surf shop are very small. Nevertheless, there's good news. Yes, you can catch waves and surf in Gibraltar.

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The surfing sanctuary of Bali

Bali offers some of the best surf spots in the world, during the dry and wet seasons. The island of 5,632 square kilometers surrounded by coral reefs is considered to be a surfer's paradise.

From May through to September, the dry season has the best waves for surfing in Bali, one of Indonesia's 34 provinces. Here, you'll find surf lines in almost all beaches.

One of the reasons why Bali is a popular surfing destination is because there are waves for all levels and experiences. Fast, hollow, mushy and relaxed wave rides can be appreciated in this island.

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Johan De Goede has taken out the 2018 Digicape Tand Invitational. The legendary event got underway in pumping eight-to-ten-foot waves in Cape Town, South Africa.

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