Flaka into flaka: all you need is speed, forward projection and tons of momentum | Photo: Carter/PWA

The flaka is one of the most popular jumping maneuvers in freestyle windsurfing.

American windsurfer Web Pedrick was the first to perform the aerial windward 360 trick. Initially, he named it "The Swayze," in honor of Patrick Swayze, but the designation evolved to flaka.

A flaka is a flat water taka. Although it is seen as a quite unnatural move because it forces the sailor to jump forward, and stick the nose of the board slightly under water, it is also a gracious maneuver.

A double flaka is harder than a simple flaka because it requires a lot of speed, coordination, and momentum to keep the rotation going for 720 degrees.

You'll need a short freestyle board with a small fin, 15-knots plus winds, and a relatively flat body of water to train the pop and rotation.

1. Gain a lot of speed, turn downwind, and unhook;
2. Carve the board gently downwind;
3. Bend the knees and look for a chop to take off from;
4. Flatten the board and bring the board over the center line;
5. Throw the mast forward, across the board, into the apparent wind;
6. Keep your arms extended, pull up your front foot, followed by your back foot;
7. Look upwind in the direction of the rotation;
8. Jump with your hips toward the clew of the sail;
9. Let the nose of the board dive underwater;
10. Extend the back leg, and bend the front knee;
11. Support the rotation by pushing down on the boom with your front hand;
12. Look toward the direction you want to go;
13. Open up the clew to finish the move, and drop your weight over the back foot to control the powered sail;
14. Complete the rotation and keep the momentum going;
15. Pop and rotate using as much previous speed;

Remember that you don't need to jump too high to perform the double flaka. Instead, the move requires a lot of forward projection, so that the first spin still carries enough momentum for a second rotation.

Make sure you keep the board flat as you take off, otherwise the rail will catch water, and you will be thrown off the board.

It is harder to learn the flaka than pulling off the flaka into flaka, so find as much speed as you can and train your horizontal projection.

After a dozen of successful flakas, the double flaka will come out naturally.

Call it a lip drop, airdrop or the world's biggest floater. One thing is certain: Kai Lenny opened a new chapter in high-performance big wave riding.

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