Corals: don't buy them, protect them | Still: Daniel Stoupin

Daniel Stoupin, a marine biologist, has captured breathtaking time-lapse footage of corals and sponges, as they look for food.

The corals and sponges were filmed under high magnification. They move very slowly, so the PhD student from the University of Queensland used the time-lapse photo technique.

The details, the colors, the patterns, the forms are part of 150,000 shots the researcher had to collect during nine months, in order to produce these incredible animated photos.

Corals: shot by Daniel Stoupin

"Often I had to wait days to process a sequence to realize that I've done mistakes and had to do it over. One frame could easily take more than 10 minutes of processing time," Stoupin explains the Daily Mail.

The scientist took the pictures in tanks and "did not buy a single coral or live rock, or in any way contribute to the industry" of corals.

"Watching the marine aquarium industry from inside during the filming process made me extremely concerned about priorities of those who often claim themselves to be reef lovers."

Daniel Stoupin hopes to contribute for the preservation of the Great Barrier Reef.

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