Kelly Slater's man-made wave will be 100 percent powered by solar energy

February 7, 2016 | Environment
Kelly Slater Wave Company: 100 percent powered by solar energy

The first surf pool developed by the Kelly Slater Wave Company (KSWC) will be 100 percent powered by solar energy.

The Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) announced that the Kelly Slater Wave Company is one of the first businesses in California to join the firm's Solar Choice program.

PG&E's Solar Choice program allows customers to purchase half or all of their electric power from solar energy locally sourced in Northern and Central California, even if they're unable to install rooftop solar due to space, lack of sun exposure or ownership limitations.

"We are committed to encouraging sustainable development at any site using our technology. As part of this commitment, we are pleased that our first site in Central California is 100 percent powered by solar energy through PG&E's Solar Choice," notes Noah Grimmett, general manager of KSWC.

"This program allows Kelly Slater Wave Company to not only be a pioneer in wave technology, but also in supporting sustainable power initiatives as we act environmentally through an alternative to installing solar panels and fulfill our vision of building the best man-made wave."

PG&E was founded in 1905. More than 55 percent of the energy the company delivers to customers comes from sources that emit no greenhouse gases. Kelly Slater's innovative surf pool is located in California's Central Valley.

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