Griffin Colapinto: the Californian win the first CT event in Supertubos, Peniche | Photo: WSL

Griffin Colapinto has taken out the 2022 MEO Pro Portugal in Supertubos, Peniche.

The San Clemente surfer beat the Brazilian in clean four-foot waves at the European Pipeline, with plenty of glassy left and right-handers on offer.

It was a special moment for Colapinto. On his first Championship Tour final, he gets his maiden elite win.

It was a dreamy journey for the young man from the Golden State.

On his way to glory, the first Californian to win the Triple Crown of Surfing had already scored the inaugural Perfect 10-point wave of the season.

Also, Colapinto launched a perfect backside air in the quarterfinals matchup against Kolohe Andino.

But could Griffin play the right tactics on Toledo? For sure. In the final, he got the bigger and better waves.

Nevertheless, the outcome was only decided on the dying minutes and after several lead exchanges - what a tight final.

The fastest surfer on the professional circuit, Toledo was on fire with his quad surfboard and famous aerial antics.

In the end, the Brazilian narrowly lost the decisive heat - only 0.14 points separated the finalists.

Finally, California

Griffin Colapinto makes history as he becomes the first California athlete to win an elite contest since Bobby Martinez.

"It's weird. It doesn't feel I've won. I'm in a calm state. It hasn't sunk in yet. I am still trying to take it in," expressed the 23-year-old.

“The beach breaks of California paid off. I was training in these exact conditions so it’s funny that we ended up doing the Final in this."

"I just can’t believe the people I had to go through to get to this win, it’s as good as it gets."

"Everything I’ve been doing has paid off. It’s crazy after the first two events, I didn’t make it past round three and it was really hard with that mid-year cut coming up, so it was a hard one mentally, but I believe in the process and trust the unknown."

"No matter what, you’re always going to be learning and that’s my favorite part of the sport that it grows you as a person. Win or lose, you’re growing."

On the women's side, Tatiana Weston-Webb defeated Lakey Peterson to claim the Portuguese women's trophy.

Lethal and powerful, the Brazilian goofy-footer was able to find her headspace and overcome her experienced opponent.

Weston-Webb got busy early and found a good set wave to lay down two big turns for a 7.33 (out of a possible 10) and the lead.

Peterson replied with a 7.10 of her own and continued to push, finding another good score on backhand snaps to turn the heat midway through.

Both surfers kept multiplying their chances, paddling for every wave coming through the lineup and giving the judging panel a lot to think about, with forehand and backhand combinations of turns on the clean little peaks of Supertubos.

"I had a terrible start of the season and I struggled to believe in myself. I continued to work hard and to rehab my knee, so it feels good," expressed Weston-Webb.

"Portugal is one of my favorite places. Peterson is ruthless and a fighter. I couldn't choose anyone better to have a final here. I tried to do whatever I could do to win the event."

"Lakey and I had such a great battle back and forth, I was really stoked just to be out there. I think I can do anything I put my mind to."

"That’s the beauty of surfing and the beauty of just trusting and believing in yourself if you have that mental ability to just overcome those obstacles that put you down."

2022 MEO Pro Portugal | Finals

Men
1. Griffin Colapinto (USA) 14.34
2. Filipe Toledo (BRA) 14.20

Women
1. Tatiana Weston-Webb (BRA) 15.33
2. Lakey Peterson (USA) 14.27

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