How to tie a surfboard leash string

Surfing
Surfboard leash string: learn how to insert it push it through the leash plug | Photo: Shutterstock

Have you bought a new surfboard leash? Did the leash string break after a wipeout? Learn how to install it correctly.

There are many ways of installing a surfboard leash and, at first glance, it seems quite obvious how it's done.

However, some techniques are far from perfect and could eventually put you in a dangerous situation, especially in challenging ocean conditions.

You'll need a parachute cord about 10 inches in length so that you can fit your leash through the hole. You can also light the ends so it becomes easier to tie a knot and it doesn't come unraveled.

First things first - tie an overhand knot and push the end back through the middle of the loop you've made. Tighten it all the way down to the bottom to get a big loop.

Now, time to attach the leash string to a surfboard:

1. Take the loop end and push it through the leash plug;
2. Use a fin key to help push it through;
3. Pull the loop out and open it up;
4. Push the knot through;
5. Pull it tight;

You may also thread the string through the plug and then the rail saver through both loops, instead of slipping the cord through itself. Some say it's twice as strong, as it puts less pressure on the string.

Surfboard leashes: a mandatory piece of equipment | Photo: Shutterstock

Attaching the Leash

Now, here's how to insert the leash through the parachute cord's loop:

1. Undo the velcro of the leash;
2. If you need, fold the velcro in half to get it through the loop;
3. Pull it through until the knot sets in the bottom;
4. Slip the knot to the side;
4. Do the velcro back up;

You don't want the leash string to be too long because you want the rail saver to be able to hit all the way around, so it doesn't damage your board's tail.

In other words, it's the rail saver that should be swinging around the rail, not the leash string.

Finally, remember that a surfboard is a dangerous weapon. Protect yourself and others - in small or big surf, always wear a leash.

The Summer Surf Gear Guide 2019