Surfrider tracks Fukushima radiation on the Pacific Coast

February 11, 2014 | Environment
Nuclear plants: dangerous and deadly

The Surfrider Foundation is tracking the potential spread of radiation from Fukushima to the Pacific Coast via air, water and marine life.

The surfing non-governmental organization is analyzing all scientific research focused on the Japanese nuclear reactor meltdown.

"There are a lot of conflicting reports in the news and on various websites and blogs. There have been many sensationalist reports that are not supported by scientific data and studies", underlines Surfrider, led by Jim Moriarty.

"Scientific data collected to date does not indicate a cause for concern with regard to concentrations of Fukushima-derived radiation in the air, seawater or seafood along the Pacific Coast".

This doesn't mean the radiation from Fukushima is not affecting the health and safety of those living along the Eastern Pacific, although "concentrations of Cesium-137 in the North Pacific Ocean were at least 10 times higher in the 1960s than concentrations measured in January 2014 along the Pacific Coast."

The Surfrider Foundation encourages groups and individuals who are interested in collecting seawater samples for testing to participate in a crowdsourced radiation monitoring program being conducted by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

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