Surfing: some people just don't want it anymore | Photo: Shutterstock

Surfing is for life, right? Well, in theory, it should be. But in reality, sometimes the destiny has other plans for our existence.

We all remember the first wave proudly rode toward the beach. It is something that we will never forget because it was the moment we became surfers.

From the day we stood up on the surfboard for the first time until now, a lot has changed. And that is especially true for people who started surfing in their teens, and are now hitting their 30s and 40s.

For the majority of us, our relationship with surfing is able to stand the test of time. With more or less time available, we manage to get our share of waves in more or less crowded line-ups.

Why? Because we need it. It's become part of our lives, like a healthy addiction that makes us better individuals. Surfing has that appealing factor, and it rarely lets us down. Even on a cloudy, onshore day when we're the only ones out there.

However, sporadically, and for some, surfing becomes a vague memory of a good time that we want to keep inside that old chest left in the attic of our dreams. It's sad, but it sometimes strikes a few of us.

So, why do some people quit surfing? Is there a valid and legit reason for stopping doing something we once loved to do? Here are five things that may stop you from surfing:

Ageing

When we're young, we are willing to do one thousand things at the same time, and our passion and dedication for the things we love doing most is nearly infinite.

We surf twice or even thrice a day, and we repeat it the next day. Ageing changes our perspective and opens up new interests in life. Surfing may no longer be the most important facet of our life.

At the same time, we tend to be more selective with the quality of the surf, and we're less inclined to put on a wetsuit on a cold Saturday winter morning.

Our confidence is no longer the same when we hit 40, and we start believing that wave riding is for the young.

Work, Job, and Career

When we start working, our life changes forever. Having a nine-to-six job absorbs a significant portion of the day, and when we finally leave the office, it's already too dark to hit the waves.

Work life is tough, and weekends became a bag of oxygen. For some, careers are an essential aspect of one's life, so surfing is nothing but an old pastime that they used to practice during summer.

Waves: surfing is for life, but only for a few | Photo: Shutterstock

Family and Kids

Raising a family with children can be an exhausting challenge. There's just too much thing to do to keep the ball running, and free time becomes a synonym for sleeping.

Of course, you could always get your partner into surfing, and then invite the kids, but you will rapidly understand how impractical and dreamy that is. Because they need your help, there's not much time to grab the board and go surfing.

Severe Injuries and Diseases

Life is constantly throwing unexpected surprises at us, and when health-related events change our lives, our priorities get reshuffled.

Cancer, strokes, respiratory infections, and chronic diseases, and road traffic crash are some of the examples of obstacles that may get in our way through life.

Psychological Trauma

There are some things we can't control. And our mind is a very special place. Extraordinarily stressful events change people forever, and if surfing is, in any way, related to them, then it will be immediately sacrificed.

Emotional disorders can trigger flashbacks, and the whole conception of a structured life - with a past, present, and hopes in the future - can simply turn the act of surfing a wave into a haunting nightmare.

And you don't need to go too far - sometimes, a wipeout is all it takes to put an end to your love of surfing.

Dimitri Maramenides, the founder and owner of Epic Kites, rode his kite a few hours before Hurricane Florence hit the East Coast of the United States.

+ Kiteboarding News