Kiteboard and Sail Size Charts

Kiteboard and Sail Size Chart: get the right board and kite for your weight and wind speed | Photo: Shutterstock

How to choose and buy a board and a kite for kiteboarding? Check our kiteboard and sail size charts.

If you're a beginner kiteboarder, the first thing you need to do is to buy yourself a complete sailing course in an official International Kiteboarding Organization (IKO) school.

Although it is an exciting wind sport, there are several safety directives and procedures that you must adopt and follow to protect yourself and all other riders out in the water.

Then, it's time to pick the board and kite that suits your weight, height, and experience level.

If you are an intermediate or advanced kiteboarder wishing to add new options to your list of equipment, check out how to size up or size down your current gear.

To convert kilograms (kg) to pounds (lb), note that 1 kilogram equals 2.2 pounds. To convert meters (m) to feet (ft), note that 1 meter equals 3.3 feet.

Kiteboards: there are twin-tip, foil, kitesurf, and light wind kiteboards | Photo: Shutterstock

How to Pick the Right Kiteboard?

After carefully selecting the right size, it's essential to know and explore the main features of a kiteboard.

Kiteboarding beginners should buy large kiteboards and a small kite. It's easier to get used to flotation and balance on a bigger board.

Smaller kites will get less wind and power, and kiteboard beginners will have more control over the equipment.

Trainer kites are also a great option for first-timers.

Intermediate and advanced kiteboarders will need bigger kiteboards and kites. This is particularly true when the wind is light, for example, in summer days.

There are several types of kiteboards: twin-tip, foil, kitesurf, and light wind kiteboards.

Kite board: choose a kite board by learning more about outline, height, width, core material, nose, tail and rocker

If you're already a seasoned surfer or windsurfer, try riding a really small kiteboard. The chances are high that you'll get used to it quickly.

Like in a surfer's well-balanced quiver, having two different kiteboards and kites - a small and large model - will allow you to ride in totally different wind conditions and will definitely improve your skills.

The most important characteristics of a kiteboard are the template outline, the rocker, the board thickness and width, the core materials, and the quality of the straps.

Now, take a look at the kiteboard size chart:

Rider Weight (lb/kg) Kiteboard Size (cm) Kiteboard Width (cm)
125-150 lb | 56-68 kg 134-148 41
150-180 lb | 68-81 kg 140-160 43
180-210 lb | 81-95 kg 142-165 45
> 210 lb | +95 kg 146-165 46

 

What Are the Main Types of Kitesurfing Kites?

There are five main types of kiteboarding kites:

C Kite
The first and original inflatable kitesurfing kite. Features square corners in a C-shaped arc when launched. The C kite gets its shape from the kite lines, which are attached at the four corners of the kite.

Bow Kite
The Bow Kite is an innovative concave kitesurfing kite with an almost flat look, after being launched in the skies. Sometimes it is called "flat kite," and its shape offers a near 100 percent de-power and large wind range features.

Types of Kitesurfing Kites

Hybrid Kite
The hybrid kiteboarding kite is a fusion of the best characteristics of the C kite and the bow kite. There are many hybrid kite variations, and some of them are almost identical to their inspirational kites.

Supported Leading Edge (SLE) Kite
The supported leading edge (SLE) is a kite that has bridles attached to its leading edge. Both hybrid kites and bow kites are considered SLE kites because they have bridles.

Foil Kite
A foil kite doesn't have air bladders. A classic foil kite is made of open cells that breathe air and inflate the kite. Therefore, it can't get in the water and is often used as a beginner kiteboarding kite to train on the beach.

Kite Size Chart

Rider Weight (kg) 43 50 57 64 70 77 84 91 98 104  111  118 Wind Speed
Rider Weight (lb) 95 110 125 140 155 170 185 200 215 230 245 260 knots mph kph
Kite Size (m2) 3 3 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 34 39 63
3 4 4 5 5 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 28 32 52
4 5 5 6 6 7 8 8 9 8 10 11 24 28 44
4 5 6 7 7 8 9 9 10 11 12 12 21 24 39
5 6 7 7 8 9 10 11 11 12 13 14 19 22 35
6 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 14 15 17 20 31
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 15 17 28
7 8 9 10 11 12 13  14 15 16 17 18 14 16 26
7 8 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 13 15 24
8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 18 19 20 21 12 14 22
8 10 11 12 14 15 16 18 19 20 22 23 11 13 20
9 10 12 13 15 16 17 19 20 22 23 24 10 12 19

 

Find the best kitesurfing kites in the world.

Explore the fundamental rules of kiteboarding.

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