"Esoterica" proves skimboarding is a high-performance sport

Skimboarding has become a high-performance water sport but, if you doubt it, watch the latest production by MOV.

MOV is a skimming collective dedicated to movie making. They want to bring the sport to the main stage and believe they don't need sponsors to do the job. All they need is a solid group of monthly video subscribers.

"Esoterica" is their fifth full-length film production, and promises to ignite the heart in every skimboarder. Every shot, every angle, and every wave is a remarkable moment. The movie features some of the world's best performers, including the one and only Austin Keen.

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When the Levante blows, the Faro skimboarders shine bright

Faro is the largest city of the Algarve, the most touristic region in Portugal. Every year, millions of people from all over the world visit this southern and warm coastline.

The Algarve has some of the most beautiful beaches on the planet, and the average air temperature is most of the times above 65 °F (18 °C). The water is consistently mild, and you rarely hear waves breaking on the shore.

Faro is facing south and sits just 150 miles away from the Mediterranean Sea, so it rarely gets north Atlantic swells. However, where there's ocean, miracles can happen. And that miracle is called Levante.

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The history of skimboarding

Where, when and how was skimboarding invented? Let's ride the glide, and discover how skimboarding evolved in its first 100 years of existence.

The sport of skimboarding has its origins around 1920, in California, when the Laguna Beach lifeguards - George Griffeth and friend Jimmy - built rounded disks made from redwood and used them to slide across the water.

"It was two planks of redwood, connected by three strips of oak held on by small machine screws and square nuts recessed into the wood. They were about five-foot long, with no curve at all, and they were towed behind a boat much like a wakeboard," Tex Haines, co-founder of Victoria Skimboards, once wrote.

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The Chilean big wave surf break of Punta de Lobos and the idyllic Australian point break of Noosa have been officially declared the 9th and 10th World Surfing Reserves, respectively.

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