Wellington Airport Control Tower: it will display different colors depending on wind speed and direction | Photo: Airways New Zealand

The Wellington Airport will build a new air traffic control tower that appears to lean into Wellington's prevailing northerly wind.

The 32-meter-high tower will lean at an angle of 12.5 degrees, considerably more than the famous Tower of Pisa, in Italy, which only leans four degrees. But the new air traffic control tower will feature innovative technology.

The nine-storey building will be equipped with LED lighting and, at night, it will display different colors depending on wind speed and direction. Wellington is considered to be the windiest city in the world.

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Crude Awakening: stop offshore drilling | Photo: Patagonia/Surfrider

A group of surfers and water sports enthusiasts paddled out more than five miles to an oil platform located off Santa Barbara.

The event supported by Surfrider Foundation and Patagonia aimed to protest and raise awareness about the dangers of offshore drilling, three months after the Refugio Oil Spill, which sent 140,000 gallons of thick crude oil to marine protected areas, and beaches.

The tragedy killed several hundred birds and marine mammals, but the effects of the industrial disaster will continue to storm the region unless authorities start planning a move towards renewable alternatives.

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Greenland: the glaciers are melting fast | Photo: NASA/NordForsk

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has revealed that the seas of the world have risen three inches (eight centimeters) since 1992. Data suggests that the sea level will likely increase by one meter or more in the next 100-200 years.

The satellite measurements from NASA and its partners concluded that about one-third of sea level rise is caused by expansion of warm ocean water, one-third is due to ice loss from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets and the remaining third results from melting mountain glaciers.

"Given what we know now about how the ocean expands as it warms and how ice sheets and glaciers are adding water to the seas, it's pretty certain we are locked into at least 3 feet [0.9 meter] of sea level rise, and probably more. But we don't know whether it will happen within a century or somewhat longer," explains Steve Nerem, a member of the Sea Level Change Team.

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