Toro de Oro: alone in the break

Nowadays, the notion of secret spots for waves does not carry much substance. Surfers take pictures of themselves riding these great waves, and they post them with a caption that they will not reveal the name of the spot because this is a secret spot in this particular country... like they are doing this great favor to humanity.

If they wanted to keep the spot secret in a honest way, they would not post any pictures of themselves at all. When you post a picture on the internet, anyone with a little bit of gray matter, Google Earth and GPS technology, will find the exact location of the place in a few hours, if not minutes.

El Salvador is a relatively small country similar in size to Israel. It only has a little bit more than 300 kilometers of coastline. Nevertheless, when it comes to surfable waves per square kilometer, it comes at the top of the pyramid, in the same league as Hawaii and Puerto Rico, if you consider these two places separate regions from mainland United States.

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Ireland: land of Guinness and surf | Photo: Creative Commons/Lee Ciaran

It's not just the land of potatoes, rain, and Guinness, you know. One of Ireland's best-kept secrets has been out of the bag for some time now: this country has world-class surf.

There are 3172 kilometres of coastline, and the southern and western shores are the first point of contact for waves originating in the remotest parts of the North Atlantic, kicked up and driven on by the relentless Gulf Stream; shaped on arrival by pristine reef.

Kelly Slater and the Malloy brothers braved the bluster, and with too many great surf spots to name in one article (and more being discovered all the time), here are five to get you thinking about following suit.

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